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The comic book community responds to the passing of Munhall artist/writer Ed Piskor

Artists and writers used social media to share their feelings about the passing of Ed Piskor, the artist/writer from Munhall known for “Hip Hop Family Tree” and “X-Men: Grand Design,” who passed away on Monday.

Artists and writers used social media to share their feelings about the passing of Ed Piskor, the artist/writer from Munhall known for “Hip Hop Family Tree” and “X-Men: Grand Design,” who passed away on Monday.

Piskor also co-founded the YouTube channel Cartoonist Kayfabe with fellow Pittsburgh area artist Jim Rugg.

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust recently delayed Piskor’s exhibition at 707 Penn Gallery after the arts organization said it found out about claims of misconduct against Piskor. Last month, a woman on Instagram alleged that Piskor made advances on her in 2020 when she was 17. Piskor was not formally charged with a crime.

Gary Groth from Fantagraphics Books, which published Piskor’s “Hip Hop Family Tree” and “Red Room,” released a statement to The Comics Journal.

“Ed was a significant figure in the devoted world of comics, endlessly intrigued by the history and legends of comics, a contagious advocate for the medium that he loved so much, and a contributor himself to that history,” he said. “We had a warm personal and professional connection and it was always enjoyable to collaborate with him. This is a terrible tragedy, and I offer as much empathy as I’m capable of to his family, whose sorrow must be unimaginable.”

Rob Liefeld, the co-creator of popular Marvel characters Deadpool and Cable, said Piskor “had a genuine love for comics. I found his passion for comics to be sincere and inspiring.”

Artist Klaus Janson, renowned for his work on Marvel’s Daredevil, described Piskor’s death as “a devastating blow.”

Don Simpson, a writer/artist from the Pittsburgh area who earned a doctorate at Pitt, said no one should be speculating about Piskor’s death.

Artist Ben Templesmith, known for the horror comic “30 Days of Night,” expressed sadness about the impact of social media played, while artist J. Scott Campbell hoped for “real lessons learned” in the aftermath.

Animator/artist Scott Morse said he felt “numb” on Monday.

Artist Ramon Villalobos, who had been mentioned in a note Piskor shared on Facebook Monday (that’s since been made private), shared his thoughts on the death.

Cartoonist Evan Dorkin, the creator of “Milk & Cheese,” was also mentioned in Piskor’s note, which prompted a lengthy response on X. “Obviously my posts hurt Ed, he singled me out in his note. I hurt Ed. I am responsible for that hurt even if I stand by my criticism.”

Piskor, 41, is survived by his parents, three siblings, and four nieces and nephews, according to an obituary.


Related

Munhall comic artist Ed Piskor dies following show's postponement amid controversy
Munhall comic book creator Ed Piskor launching horror title 'Red Room'
Pittsburgh comic artist Ed Piskor drawing new 'X-Men' series


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