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Munhall cartoonist Ed Piskor passed away after the postponement of his show amidst controversy

Ed Piskor, a well-known Munhall comic artist who recently became embroiled in controversy over allegations of sexual misconduct, has died, the funeral home handling his arrangements confirmed Monday.

Ed Piskor, a well-known Munhall comic artist who recently became embroiled in controversy over allegations of sexual misconduct, has died, the funeral home handling his arrangements confirmed Monday. 

Piskor, who was 41, died unexpectedly on Monday, as stated in an obituary shared on the internet

by the Savolskis-Wasik-Glenn Funeral Home of Munhall.

Piskor’s family chose not to comment on Monday evening.

Earlier, Piskor’s sister Justine Cleaves informed on Facebook: “It is with the most broken heart that I share my big brother, Ed, has passed away today. Please just keep our family in your prayers as this is the hardest thing we’ve ever had to go through.”

Piskor had been involved in comic book series like “American Splendor” and “X-Men.” He received an Eisner Award for his work on “Hip-Hop Family Tree,” a historical representation of hip-hop culture.

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust recently delayed Piskor’s exhibition at 707 Penn Gallery after the arts organization became aware of allegations of misconduct against Piskor. The exhibition was planned to be held from April 6 to Aug. 25.

In the previous month, a woman claimed on Instagram that Piskor made advances on her in 2020 when she was 17. She accused him of attempting to “groom” her, stating that Piskor inquired about her age and invited her to stay with him.

Piskor was not formally accused of a crime.

Earlier Monday, Piskor posted on social media that the allegations had caused him pain. He wrote “I’m helpless against a mob of this magnitude” and “Sayonara,” Japanese for goodbye.

“Now it’s all gone. Art show evaporated,” wrote Piskor. “… I have no friends in this life any longer. I’m a disappointment to everybody who liked me. I’m a pariah.”

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Monday.

Piskor is survived by his parents, three siblings and four nieces and nephews.

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